Chinn Street Counseling Center of Sonoma County home  
 
Chinn Street Counseling Center
405 Chinn Street
Santa Rosa, CA 95404
map
 
 
Adults

Children

Teens

Couples

Families

Groups
 
sonoma county domestic violence and child abuse recovery Adult Children
of Alcoholics (ACA)


Blended & Step Families

Child Custody Mediation
& Co-Parent Counseling


Co-Dependency

Co-Parent Education
santa rosa counseling for PTSD and post traumatic stress disorder syndrome Depression & Anxiety

Domestic Violence

Gay/Lesbian
/Transgender


Grief & Loss

Incest &
Molestation
Recovery


Meditation
therapy for step and blended families and children Mindfulness Practice

Parenting

Premarital
Counseling


Psychological
Astrology


PTSD & Trauma
Recovery
santa rosa and windsor psychotherapy services Relationship
& Marriage


Self-Esteem

Separation
& Divorce


Shyness &
Social Anxiety


Spirituality

Women's Issues
 
Adults
Developmental stages are not confined to childhood. As adults we look toward committed relationships (or the lack thereof), being parents (or not), continuing career choices, the growing awareness of losing our youthfulness during middle age, and the challenges of aging thereafter. At any point we may face existential questions about the meaning of life, and our place and purpose in it.

In addition, life's curveballs can throw us off balance and render our usual coping styles useless. Therapy can smooth transitions and foster the inherent wisdom in each one of us that allows us to grow toward true maturity.
  Counselors addressing
Adult Issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACA)
ACA addresses the specific traumas associated with growing up in an alcoholic family. Some of the more common feelings or behavior patterns of people who grew up in this kind of environment include:
  • an exaggerated sense of responsibility
  • difficulty making and maintaining healthy relationships
  • an excessive need to control oneself or others
  • recurring feelings of isolation, loneliness and sadness
  • an inability to recognize and assert one's own needs
  • extreme sensitivity to criticism
  • addictive behaviors of all kinds
Therapy, often in conjunction with ACA support groups, can be very helpful in normalizing and working through the trauma of growing up in an alcoholic family.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Adult Children
of Alcoholics:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
 
Blended & Step Families
Recent longitudinal studies indicate that the long term effects of divorce on children are significant. Adult children of divorce report that they have been effected by their parents divorce in many areas throughout their lives. The high rate of divorce in the United States has led to an increasing number of families whose family configuration has changed. In the event that either parent remarries, the original family is changed and all the members find themselves making shifts to incorporate new family members. Family therapy can prove to be very helpful to all members of the families, original, blended, or step, as it gives a neutral forum for the discussion of the issues that arise. Parents can be seen individually, and together, with their new partners, and also with their children in order to define new family rules and roles. Child and adolescent therapy sessions can help to identify any areas of potential difficulty and aide the children in making sense of and adjusting to the dramatic changes that have taken place in their lives as a result of their parent's divorce.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Blended &
Step Families:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Children
Child Therapy is tailored to the developmental readiness of the child as well as the individual temperament. Play may be the primary language expressing a child's world. Just as adults have differing coping styles, children cope with life's challenges uniquely. A timely counseling intervention to aid a child's response to stressful or traumatic events helps in the immediate crisis and may transform the long-term effects.

Verbal or physical aggression, withdrawal, or academic lethargy may all be symptoms of deep vulnerable feelings and parents may seek support from an assessment outside the family circle. Issues that bring a child to therapy range from social skills coaching and nurturing self-esteem or coping with academic difficulty to the effects of physical or sexual abuse. The death or illness of a family member or caretaker, changes in the family resulting from divorce/separation or the effect of substance abuse on the family constellation are all issues that initiate the therapeutic relationship.

Depression and anxiety in children may look very different from the adult forms expressed as anger or acting out behaviors. The highly sensitive child can thrive in the therapeutic setting as coping skills are developed to help their temperament to blossom.
  Counselor addressing
Children's issues:


   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Child Custody Mediation & Co-Parent Counseling
Many separating or divorcing families would like assistance setting up parenting plans that are best for their children. Mediation offers parents the opportunity to meet with a trained professional in a safe, neutral environment in order to resolve disagreements and to set up parenting plans that meet their children's needs. Most parents find that mediation helps promote positive communication, increases parental cooperation and gives parents methods to resolve future conflicts. Mediation is less costly than going to Court, and sets parents on a course of cooperation rather than litigation. It allows parents the opportunity to retain control of the decision making process regarding the care of their children.

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  Counselors addressing
Child Custody and
Co-parenting issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
 
Co-Dependency
Co-dependence is the term used to describe the dysfunctional coping strategies used by people who grew up in alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional families. The more common feelings or behavior patterns include:
  • changing who you are to please others
  • feeling responsible for meeting others needs at the expense of your own
  • low self esteem
  • compulsive behavior
  • denial
Therapy can often be helpful in normalizing and working through the painful patterns of co-dependent behavior and help clients to learn more effective and functional ways of taking care of themselves.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Codependency:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Co-Parent Education
Divorced parents are challenged to continue parenting together when their own relationship is dissolving or completely severed and oftentimes highly conflictual. Understanding the impact of divorce on children and putting their needs first is core to building a cooperative co-parenting team. Co-parents can learn how to avoid the pitfalls of loyalty binds, bad mouthing and confusion arising from different parenting styles and rules. Basic tools help parents manage and defuse hurt feelings, set healthy boundaries and communicate in ways that reduce conflict and increase safety.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Co-Parent
Education:


   Barbara Bowen, MFT
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
 
Couples
Relationships can be very rewarding when they are going well. When relationships become troubled, they can be very painful, and can lead to feelings of anger, frustration, disappointment, self-doubt and hopelessness. Sometimes couples have a clear idea what does not work in their relationship, and want assistance in developing an action plan to address particular issues. At other times, it is hard for them to know what is not working; it just feels that the relationship has lost its attraction and good feeling. Communication problems are common and often lead to further misunderstanding.

Couples counseling can help each person better understand what is going on with themselves and the other person, as well as what is happening between them. It provides a healing format for resolving past hurts and misunderstandings. Learning new communication skills is often a central ingredient. Feeling heard and respected by the other person, developing better ways of dealing with problems, healing old wounds, and coming to mutual decisions can lay a strong foundation for developing a more pleasant and satisfying relationship.


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  Counselors addressing
Couples issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Depression & Anxiety
Depression comes in two basic forms: situational or clinical. In situational depression one can usually identify a stressor or stressors that lead to the sense of feeling down. Clinical depression, on the other hand, has at its root a biological/chemical component. Both types of depression can benefit greatly from therapy; however, people suffering from the latter type additionally may need an evaluation by a doctor to determine possible supplement or medication treatment.

Typical symptoms of either type of depression are: increased or decreased sleep and/or appetite, low energy, self-loathing, irritability, hopelessness, and/or thoughts of ending one's life. There are many variations within depression, including anxiety or manic stages that alter the picture and may make detection of what is really going on difficult and confusing. Please consult a physician, mental health professional, or literature to find out more.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Depression &
Anxiety:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Domestic Violence
No one sets out to hurt the people closest to them, but sometimes anger, fear, jealousy and resentment explode in the form of violence toward one's partner. The continuum of domestic violence ranges from verbal putdowns and attempts to control one's partner, to intimidation, threats, damaging of property or throwing objects, to physical assaults on another person and battering, which at its worse may cause significant bodily harm.

People who are violent need assistance learning how to manage difficult feelings without blaming and attacking their partners. Many people who are violent feel out of control, and resort to violence because they feel desperate, or because they have learned a pattern of violence in their own families. After a violent incident, the aggressor is often left with a feeling of deep regret and shame, and may feel desperate to "make up" with the person they have attacked. Being able to handle oneself well in a situation that is troubling increases self-esteem and lays to groundwork for establishing a relationship that is respectful of oneself and the other person.

People the victim of verbal or physical abuse often need help understanding that they did not cause the violence. They may have developed a pattern of believing that if they were more lovable or were a better person, the violence would not happen, as they were often told by their abuser. Often they need help learning to prioritize their own needs and to expect their partner to be responsible for their own behavior. They often feel caught in the violent or demeaning relationship and may need support and assistance in order to gain the courage to protect themselves from violence or to consider whether to leave a relationship that is destructive.

  Counselors addressing
issues of Domestic Violence:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
 
Families
Family relationships can be the most meaningful relationships of our lives. It is within our family of origin that we develop our sense of self, our view of the world, our way of relating to others, and our expectations of how others will relate to us. We carry what we have learned in our family of origin into the families we develop as adults.

The term "family therapy" is used to describe both working on issues developed in our family of origin in an individual therapy framework, or meeting jointly with family members. By using a family therapy model in individual therapy we can learn about ourselves by understanding the impact our family has had on us. Personal growth and development can be advanced by finding the balance between accepting who we have become because of our family experience and differentiating ourselves from our families of origin.

When one person in a family has a problem, or if tensions or relationship problems exist within a family, it is common for all family members to be affected, and it is often helpful to meet jointly with some of all family members. Joint meetings can help family members develop a more complete understanding of the problem and learn new ways of relating to each other in a way that each person in the family benefits.


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  Counselors addressing
Family issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Gay, Lesbian & Transgender Issues
Many gay and lesbian adults and couples enter therapy with issues of anxiety, depression and relationship. But gay, lesbian and transgender teens and adults face additional and specific social stigmas. Parental and societal rejection, religion based guilt, projected shame and fear (homophobia) and gay and transgender bashing and bullying all reinforce lack of self-acceptance at one's core (internalized homophobia). Therapy often includes validation of feelings and experience, releasing internalized shame and judgment, self-esteem building and connection with supportive community resources.
  Counselors addressing
Gay, Lesbian &
Transgender issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Grief & Loss
Experiencing grief and loss is part of every human journey. Feelings that may accompany this life transition include sadness, fear, anger, confusion, or numbness. An individual's needs can vary a great deal when responding to a loss; sometimes requiring space and privacy, other times needing contact and companionship. The response to a loss may happen soon after the event or be delayed for a long time. Current losses may bring up memories from long ago experiences. Depression is a common component of the grieving process, and sometimes needs professional help. Individual therapy or a group focused around the issues of grief and loss can help provide needed support.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Grief & Loss:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Groups

Counselors with ongoing groups include:

Shonnie Brown, MFT

    Co-Parent Empowerment Group -- 6-week program for adults struggling to establish or maintain a cooperative co-parenting relationship.

    Moving Beyond Shyness -- an interactive therapy group for adults with shyness or social anxiety.

    Separation/Divorce/Transition (for women) -- a support group for women at any stage of the separation process.

    Separation/Divorce/Transition (coed) -- a support group for men and women at any stage of the separation/divorce process.
Shoshona Pascoe, MFT

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Incest & Molestation Recovery
Incest or molest comes in many forms, from physical contact to looks, from physically violent to "loving", from exposure to pornography to being coerced to participate in it. It does not matter which form it takes, the injury is always the same: betrayal of trust by an adult to a child, or an older sibling to a younger sibling. If you have experienced anything that has violated the safety of your sexual boundary when you were growing up, likelihood is that you experience internal conflict and difficulties in relationships as an adult. Therapy can help heal old wounds, restore a sense of self, and improve how you relate to others.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Incest &
Molestation Recovery:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
 
Meditation
Meditative tools can be useful adjuncts to the psychotherapy process. Meditation invites an inner focus, pausing from the usual habits of our thinking/feeling selves to allow for a settling and deepening. Though turmoil within may be felt more keenly, a calming effect may also arise as we settle into the truth of our inner experience. The breath is often used as an object of attention in meditation, encouraging an attunement to the simplicity of a felt-sense; a trust in our own mind/body experience.
  Counselors addressing
Meditation:


   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Mindfulness Practice
Mindfulness is an inherent part of Buddhist practice and refers to the non-judgmental focus on the here and now. As Buddhism and particularly Buddhist Psychology have become increasingly popular in the West, many mental health professionals have seen the value of this practice for general wellbeing as well as for addressing such difficult conditions as Posttraumatic Stress and general anxiety. Your therapist can guide you into developing an inner witness that observes your thoughts and feelings, other people and outer events without criticizing them. From that position, a more wholesome ability to respond awakens.
  Counselors addressing
Mindfulness:


   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT

 

 
Parenting
The parenting task brings with it a combination of, what appear to be, opposite feelings; tremendous joy, profound disappointment, inspiration, hopelessness, energy and exhaustion to name a few examples. Feelings usually run strong. A couple may find themselves encountering challenges in communication, intimacy, and values that did not arise before the couple was transformed into a family. The parenting models we experienced growing up in our own families may not satisfy our visions for ourselves as parents. Therapy can help provide support to parents who are overwhelmed or stressed, or provide a safe place to explore the tremendous opportunity for growth that becoming a parent offers.
  Counselors addressing
Parenting issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Premarital Counseling
We offer the opportunity for "young" (not necessarily in age) couples to look at their values, goals, and beliefs; to explore how families of origin may either aid or hamper in the development of true interdependence and intimacy; and we teach comprehensive listening and communication tools that will make the merging of two lives easier and more heart-felt.

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  Counselors addressing
Premarital Counseling:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Psychological Astrology
Astrology can help cultivate a witness self that transforms the inner critic to sacred witness. As a language of the inner self and its relation to the outer world, Astrology provides a natural complement to the psychotherapeutic process. The astrological metaphor can be understood as a tool, another way to view the dilemmas we face, and a way to connect to universal themes that bring us into relationship with others and the human journey in general.
  Counselors addressing
Psychological Astrology:


   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
PTSD & Trauma Recovery
People who have experienced or witnessed traumatic events often suffer uncomfortable symptoms related to the event. Some people may have immediate reactions while others find that they seemed to have navigated the event without troubling feelings at the time but develop symptoms weeks, months or even years later. People who suffer from Post-traumatic Stress Disorder may experience nightmares or sudden memories that occur without apparent reason. They may find that they become more fearful, have panic attacks, and avoid situations that may be reminders of the event, withdraw from social activities, feel more suspicious or threatened, or have body pains or memories. Psychotherapy can provide a safe place to navigate through the feelings related to trauma, which may include horror, rage, depression, fear, guilt, shame, or numbness. It can help people create a meaningful context for the trauma and reclaim a sense of safety in the world.
  Counselors addressing
issues of PTSD &
Trauma Recovery:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
 
Relationship & Marriage
The high divorce rate of the last 30 years is a reflection of the drastic changes our society has undergone during that time. Relationships, whether newly formed or seasoned, whether with or without children, whether hetero- or homosexual, face problems and challenges today that can be overwhelming. In recent years a lot of research has been done on what makes couples work well together and stay together. Therapy can teach partners detailed skills to enhance the relationship. It also can look at dysfunctional patterns that have their root in childhood and use the relationship to heal old wounds.

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  Counselors addressing
issues of Relationship &
Marriage:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Self-Esteem
Self-esteem may be defined as the way we hold or value ourselves in relation to others and the world. Self-esteem is developed through parental acceptance and respect, healthy parental limits, and an early environment supportive of individual autonomy. Good self-esteem is indicated by self-acceptance, a healthy self-concept and reasonable expectations of self and others. High self-esteem individuals feel effective, capable and loving. Low self-esteem leads to feeling ineffective, incapable and unlovable. Feelings of low self-esteem are not reality based, but grounded in internalized rejecting and critical messages. Self-esteem is a pervasive theme in therapy because it is intimately related to how we function and how we are in relationship.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Self-Esteem:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Separation & Divorce
The separation and divorce process has a huge emotional impact on the individual and the family. Divorce is very often isolating and stigmatizing, and may affect virtually all aspects of one's life. Divorcing adults and their children need to be listened to and need validation from someone who understands thier experience. Issues of betrayal and rejection, injured self-esteem, lack of closure, financial/lifestyle changes and co-parenting intensify the emotional process. Individual, couple, family and group therapy may all be supportive treatment approaches during this very challenging life transition.
 
  Counselors addressing
issues of Separation &
Divorce:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Shyness & Social Anxiety
The erosion of self-esteem that causes avoidance of social and performance situations leading to isolation and depression is known as social anxiety. Very shy people often have a personal history of ridicule and judgment that makes them believe they are "different from everyone else". They feel handicapped in their ability to seek help, to make contact with others and form intimate relationships. They feel completely inadequate in a wide range of social skills that most people take for granted. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, goal setting, education and safe group interaction are all recommended treatments for this pervasive and disabling problem.

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  Counselors addressing
issues of Shyness &
Social Anxiety:


   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Spirituality
Spirituality is defined as that which is intangible or non-material. It relates to matters of the soul. Most people ask themselves at some point in their lives the questions: "Who am I? Where do I come from? And where am I going?" Personal and cultural histories, which are tangible, bring a lot of information to these questions. But usually these questions address a deeper level, namely an urge to have a sense of one's overall place in life, to find meaning in life's unfolding, and to know oneself as integral part of a larger whole. Without offering definite answers therapy is a wonderful vehicle into the realm of the soul, aiding each individual in discovering his or her own inner truths.
  Counselors addressing
issues of Spirituality:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Teens
Adolescence is a challenging time for both teens and their parents. For teens, it is a period of rapid intellectual, social, and emotional change as they struggle to move from dependent child to independent adult. For parents it is a time when their children take risks and experiment while learning the skills necessary to become autonomous adults. This transition period can be a scary and volatile time for both parent and child. Parents often need to learn how to communicate and support their teen in a different and more age appropriate way than they did when they were children. Children often need help learning assertiveness, responsibility and decision-making so they can make the transition safely. Therapy can provide a neutral and supportive environment to navigate these issues.
  Counselors addressing
Teen issues:


   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
 
Women's Issues
Many women find that they have issues in common stemming from the culture in which they are raised, or find that some of their personal struggles are related to the way in which they are raised as women. Women often find it difficult to develop the parts of themselves that have traditionally been seen as masculine, such as being independent, self-assured, competitive or standing up for their own interests, and often feel confined by roles that are traditionally feminine. They may struggle to find a balance between embracing the feminine parts of themselves that are of value and allowing themselves to develop beyond cultural expectations. Psychotherapy can be effective in offering women a forum in which to explore their predicament, challenge roles that they do not want to embrace and to move forward in ways that are more satisfying.

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  Counselors addressing
Women's issues:


   Barbara Bowen, LCSW
   Shonnie Brown, MFT
   Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
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Shoshona Pascoe, MFT
Shonnie Brown, MFTBarbara Bowen, LCSW

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